Wednesday, 22 November 2017

Binary Lesson 4 bitmap images

In this lesson you will learn how colours are represented on a computer screen or tv.

Objectives and Outcomes

  • be able to explain how binary is used to create images (band 4).
  • be able to apply your understanding to create an image using binary (band 5).
  • be able to link the theory of binary images to file sizes and how this can affect upload and download times of different images to and from the internet (band 6).
Your tasks

1.  Open a new blog post and title it the same as this one.

2.  Explain how binary is used to create images.  
This slideshow may help remind you...


3.  Make a copy of the bitmap work sheet below and design a bitmap image by inputting the binary code for the colours you want in the relevant cell.


4.  When you have finished it, share it to anyone with the link and copy/paste the link to your blog post under your written work for task 2.

5.  Try to work out the file size (in bytes) of your bitmap image (remember each pixel has 4 bits so add them up for total and then divide by 8 for the number of bytes).

6.  Explain how this work links to download and upload times of images to and from the internet.

Publish!


Friday, 10 November 2017

Binary lesson 3 - letters

In this lesson you will discover how binary is used to represent all the letters and symbols on the keyboard, as well as numbers.

Objectives and Outcomes

  • Be able to describe how computers only understand binary.
  • Be able to explain how binary is used to represent letters as well as numbers.
  • Be able to apply this understanding to decode and code messages from binary and into binary.
  • Link ideas of binary code to any other codes you know that only have 2 symbols.
Your tasks
1.  On a new post titled the same as this, describe how computers only understand binary.
2.  Explain how binary is used to represent letters as well as numbers and give 3 examples.

Use this slideshow if you need reminding for this task....

3.  Go to the 'Binary messages to decode' Google doc below and, using the ASCII codes link below, work out what the messages say.



4.  Write the number of each message and what it says on your post.

5.  Now write 3 messages in binary for another person to decode (not rude!).

6.  Write both the message in binary and the message in letters on your post.

7.  Describe on your post any examples of other messaging codes that are binary, ie only use 2 symbols.

8.  Are there other codes that computers use?  Try to find out info on hexadecimal code, what it is and how computers use it.

Wednesday, 1 November 2017

Binary Lesson 2 - numbers

Last lesson you learned about binary code and how to change between denary (decimal) numbers and binary numbers.

This lesson you are going to learn how to add up binary numbers.

Objectives and Outcomes

  • Be able to explain how binary is used to represent denary (decimal) numbers. (band 4)
  • Be able to apply your understanding to adding binary numbers together and converting them to denary. (band 5)
  • Be able to link the ideas of binary code and your knowledge of electricity to show why computers can only use binary code to represent data (information). (band 6)
Your Tasks
1.  Open a new blog post and title it the same as this one.

2.  Copy/paste the Objectives and Outcomes on your post.

3.  Underneath them write, in your own words, how binary is used to represent denary or decimal numbers.

4.  Try and show your knowledge and understanding of Band 6 statement in Objectives and Outcomes by answering it under Task 3 writing.

5.  Open this link.....Adding binary numbers work sheet

Make a copy of the worksheet (File - Make a copy) before you try and work on it.

6.  Work through adding 3 and 4 bit numbers.

7.  Work through adding 3, 4 and 6 bit numbers.

8.  Work through adding 3, 4, 6 and 8 bit numbers.

You can use this slideshow if it helps you to remember how to add binary numbers...

9.  When you are finished, share your worksheet (click Share - Advanced - change it from Private to Anyone with the link) and copy/paste the link to your blog post.

Extension!!!
https://docs.google.com/a/cooper.oxon.sch.uk/spreadsheets/d/1o8jjyMlHxTHbXeP2aCUGnY5UJK3H4GkTocmeD32yIoo/edit?usp=sharing

Publish!


Monday, 30 October 2017

Binary Lesson 1

In this unit you are going to find out how computers communicate and store information.

Objectives and Outcomes


  • Be able to explain how binary is used to represent numbers
  • Be able to apply your understanding by adding binary numbers together and converting decimal numbers to binary
Go to this slideshow to find out more....

Binary - what is it?

Your Tasks!
On a new blog post titled the same as this one.....

1.  Write the Objectives and Outcomes on your post.

2.  Explain what binary code is and how a computer creates the pattern of the code.

3.  Explain how we can work out what decimal numbers the binary code is showing (you can use my example or a different one if you want).


You will need to make a copy....File - Make a Copy before you start

 5.  Work through each Task / sheet in turn (there are 4 altogether).
Silver should get through Task 1 and 2.
Gold should get through Task 3, and possibly 4.

Share your Google sheet  - Share - advanced - change it from Private to Anyone with the link.



Copy/paste the link to your blog post under your writing and Publish!

Wednesday, 11 October 2017

Algorithms lesson 3 - searching

In this lesson you are going to find out about the two types of computer searching.

Your lesson objectives and outcomes are:

Explain what a search algorithm is and how serial and binary search algorithms work.
Apply your understanding by giving an example of how each search algorithm works for a set of numbers
Link your examples to previous work by drawing them out as two separate flow charts, showing the search procedure.

There are 2 types of computer searching: serial and binary.

Serial searching
This is where each item is checked in turn, eg trying to find a needle in a haystack where each clump of hay is picked up in sequence and checked underneath for a needle.

Binary searching
Here the items have to be in order so that, if searching for a name in a list in alphabetical order, the computer selects one at random and then compares it with the alphabet as to whether it needs to search to the left or right and eliminates those letters that are above it, eg searching for Fred and randomly chooses 'G'.  Letters to the right (H onwards) are dismissed and it checks at random another to the left and continues the search as  before.

Your tasks

1.  In detail, explain how a serial search would work in searching for a ball under 5 cups.


2.  In detail, explain how binary search would be used to search for the number 25 in the sequence below...

2   8   9   11  17   19   21   25   31   34   45   57   59   62   66   71

3.  For a binary search to work, what has to be correct with the data?

4.  Go to the Bitesize link below, read through the information and then have a go at the test.  Write down your test score on your blog under your written work for tasks 1 -3.
Link to Bitesize info and test



Wednesday, 4 October 2017

Baseline Assessment Test


This is a test to see how much knowledge you already have about computers and computing.  There is no Pass or Fail!

Work through all the questions carefully, writing down your answers on paper. 

Make sure you are clear with question numbers so I know which question you are answering!

Link to Yr 8 Baseline Assessment

Friday, 22 September 2017

Revision guidance for Baseline Assessment test

Next lesson will be your Baseline Assessment test.  There is nothing to worry about - we just want to find out where students are with their skills and knowledge in computing.

I think it would be a good idea to show yourselves at your best by preparing for the test with some revision on stuff from last year.

To help you with this (and at the risk of giving you some clues as to what the questions might be about....!), click on the link below for guidance on what to revise.  

Revision guidance for Yr 8 Baseline Assessment

Use your blog posts from last year.  Learning computing website (learningcomputing .co.uk) has some of the work from last year but some units are not available anymore.

Make notes on a blog post for your work on this.  The test will be visible online but your answers will be written on paper.

Remember: good preparation + good revision = good results (and happy and unworried teacher!)   :-)